Patient Satisfaction Scores Will Cause Discrimination

Patient Satisfaction Scores Will Cause Discrimination

Patient Satisfaction Scores Will Cause Discrimination

0

As healthcare delivery continues to evolve in the US,  we are seeing efforts by governmental agencies to use patient satisfaction scores to determine compensation.  I think this will become a source of  DISCRIMINATION  AGAINST FUTURE PATIENTS.

Currently hospitals and physicians are being rated by patients for communication,  caring,  empathy,  etc.  Uniform government developed surveys are mailed to all patients during a certain time period,  and all the comments and scores are tabulated. Bad scores may mean reduced compensation to the hospitals and physicians by the government.  Various costly consulting groups are now being deployed by the most profitable Hospitals,  to achieve better scores.  Like many regulations,  only the financially strong will be able to hire the best.  The poorer hospitals,  in the rural communities,  or inner cities will not be able to compete.  Of course,  these are the hospitals that are caring for the most vulnerable,  and sick

The consultants often re-package the obvious.  The recommendations comes down to simple things like taking time to greet the patient.  Wearing name badges and introducing yourselves.  Sitting down when having important interactions.  Other times,  recommendations include refurbishing the hospital with private rooms.   Each hospital is compared to other hospitals on a quarterly basis.  Because it is a comparison and ranking system,  it will be an ongoing process.  Lower ranking facilities will be monetarily penalized by the payers.   Many of those rural and inner city hospitals mentioned above will close as they cannot keep up with the constant costs associated with improving satisfaction scores.

Hospitals and doctors will evolve like all business entities,  and will start to focus on the best customers,  and not market to those that may cause extra costs to the business.    As we discussed above,  all patients are surveyed.    In the ideal setting,  all the patients that were admitted should be the ones that would be the most satisfied.    Marketing experts can achieve that goal.  Marketing will target healthier,  wealthier patients,  that tend to do better,  and return good satisfaction surveys.   Some might call that discriminatory.

In the July 1, 2015 issue of Spine,  Bible et al wrote a paper titled “What Patient Characteristics Could Potentially Affect Patient Satisfaction Scores During Spine Clinic?”.    In this paper,  200 patients of an outpatient spine clinic were contacted by phone to answer 25 survey questions.  The questions were designed to score satisfaction with 1. the provider,  2. the overall visit and 3. quality of overall care.

The results of the demographic analysis indicated being younger,  being a smoker,  and having less formal education  are associated with decreased satisfaction scores.

In addition,  the abstract states:

“Marital status, working status, mental health history, travel distance, pain characteristics, previous treatments, and current narcotic use were not significant determinants of patient satisfaction.”

As hospitals and physicians start to understand the ramifications of taking care of the population that will be less satisfied,  the business office of the hospital will decide that taking care of this population will be too costly to their reputation and revenue.    This will lead to further healthcare access issues for this population.   This is yet another example of the unintended consequences of a seemingly good goal of trying to improve patient satisfaction.   In the end,  it will cost more,  and limit access to the population that needs healthcare the most.

No comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*

Disclosure Statement

The information provided on this website does not provide or should be considered medical advice. It is not a substitute for diagnosis or treatment of any condition. The information provided is for informational purposes only. You should not rely solely on the information provided on this website in making a decision to pursue a specific treatment or advice. You should consult directly with a professional healthcare provider.

As a condition of using the information on this website, ShimSpine and its physicians are not responsible for any advice, diagnosis, treatment or outcome you may obtain.

ShimSpine.com is completely self-funded. No outside funds are accepted or used. This website does not utilize paid advertising as a source of revenue.

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.

Author and Contributor to www.Spine-Health.com – July, 2015

www.Spine-Health.com/author/john-h-shim-md-facs

Chief of Surgery, Mease Countryside and Mease Dunedin Hospitals, Safety Harbor and Dunedin, Florida. 2014-2016.

Orthopaedic Section Chief Mease Countryside Hospital; Safety Harbor, Florida Mease Dunedin Hospital; Dunedin, Florida.2008-2013

Board Member Morton Plant Mease Research Council

Co-Director of Mease Neuro-Ortho Spine Center Mease Dunedin Hospital; Dunedin, Florida.

One of “6 Spine Physicians Ranked #1 on Google” – December 2016

Top Ten Most Liked Spine Surgeons on the Internet – July 2016

2016 Spine Surgeons to Know list – January 2016

2014 Spine Specialists to know list – September 2014

One of Ten Leaders of Certified Spine Programs – December 2011

 

The Best Orthopedics in Tampa

The information provided on this website does not provide or should be considered medical advice. It is not a substitute for diagnosis or treatment of any condition. The information provided is for informational purposes only. You should not rely solely on the information provided on this website in making a decision to pursue a specific treatment or advice. You should consult directly with a professional healthcare provider.

As a condition of using the information on this website, ShimSpine and its physicians are not responsible for any advice, diagnosis, treatment or outcome you may obtain.

ShimSpine.com is completely self-funded. No outside funds are accepted or used. This website does not utilize paid advertising as a source of revenue.
Outpatient Spine Surgery Considerations. www.Spine-Health.com. January 2016.

What is Spinal Stenosis? www.Spine-Health.com. October 2015.

Surgeon insights on the Changing Landscape of Orthopedic Care. OrthopedicToday. June 2014

Chapter 33: Interspinous Spacers. Shim JH, Mazza JS, Kim DH Published in Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Spinal Techniques. Elsevier Health Sciences, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Published 2011)

Chapter 35: Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Lumbar Fusion Technique.Shim JH, Mazza JS, Kim DH Published in Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Spinal Techniques. Elsevier Health Sciences, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Published 2011)

March 2010 Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting New Orleans, Louisiana February 2010

February 2010 A Review of Dynamic Stabilization in the Lumbar Spine Selby Spine Symposium; Park City, Utah

November 2009 Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Community Based Lecture; Tampa, Florida

September 2009 Instructor/Proctor Minimally Invasive Lumbar Cadaver Lab; Tampa, Florida

February 2009 New Spinal Technology: Cervical Disc Replacement and Interspinous Spacers. Selby Spine Symposium; Park City, Utah

February 2008 The Degenerative Spine: The Role of Dynamic Lumbar Stablization and Interspinous Spacers Selby Spine Symposium; Park City, Utah

October 2008 Emerging Technology and Techniques in Spinal Surgery Orthopaedics in the 21st Century Symposium; Morton Plant Mease Healthcare; Largo, Florida

September 2007 Emerging Technology in Spinal Surgery Orthopaedics in the 21st Century Symposium; Morton Plant Mease Healthcare; Largo, Florida

October 2006 Emerging Technology and Techniques in Spinal Surgery Orthopaedics in the 21st Century Symposium; Morton Plant Mease Healthcare; Largo, Florida

May 2005 The Role of Kyphoplasty in the Treatment of Vertebral Compression Fractures Mease Neurosciences Symposium; Clearwater, Florida
Please note all articles, blogs and Q&A’s on this site are general information and are not to be used as medical advice for individuals. No specific diagnosis or treatment should be made based on this information. Only a physician can provide you with advice specific to your situation. Please followup with your physician if you would like to discuss your individual condition.

If you are having a medical emergency,  contact your Doctor immediately,  or go to the Emergency Room.
ShimSpine and ShimSpine.com is committed to honoring and respecting the privacy and anonymity of the individuals using its website(s) and/or services. The purpose of this Privacy Policy is to inform the individuals about the collection, processing and protection of information done by ShimSpine what information we collect, why we collect this information and how we use this information.

This Privacy Policy will be reviewed regularly to reflect the up-to-date practices of ShimSpine.